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Moderation

A selection of work tempering the headlong rush to certainty.

The Frameless Image

A selection of work proporting to use the globe as a siteplan.

Repulsion Suspicion

A selection of work deterring the viewer.

Building the Eye

A selection of work premised on the wave of projects as "ideal theatres".
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High Holdings

High Holdings constitutes an environment for the generation of architectural knowledge. It sits within a cascade of major thought-revelations being forged by the raw power to process colossal amounts of information. Convened by Valle Medina and Benjamin Reynolds of Pa.LaC.E, High Holdings addresses the unfolding depictions of the world that may appear unrecognizable but are truly products of terrestrial occupation.

High Holdings is taking place at the Royal College of the Arts, London.

Main site: High Holdings

IG: @rca.ads12

Enquiries: ho@ldin.gs

Website: SN 1006

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Moderation

In 16th century Europe, political bodies had jurisdiction over the visual integrity of images that would come to adorn cities and their institutions. It was thought that miracles and their visual resemblance depicted in paintings could be mistaken for trickery—false gods—thus visual dilemmas became philosophical problems and institutions became vulnerable to their very core.

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Frameless Image

We’re now witnessing the emergence of a comprehensive spatial record of the world via imagery. The world is being shown to us again. Maps of stitched images allow a viewer to travel from one image to the next without ever encountering the frame and the map is no longer bound to a finite domain, nor is it exclusive to “the outside”. It is a “total image” (Hoelzl).

After the donation of floor plans to map services, the total image extends to a realm architecture has made: the interior. The floor plan is now the looping seamless map and today’s architect is one who organises space for remote traversing. An architecture of occupation without inhabitation.

Alongside the total world image we’re seeing the advent of the Chronic Image: a comprehensive temporal record of an individual’s life. The frequent pulse of image-making that is not yet continuous so as to be a moving image, but spans time enough to become a lifelong portrait project.

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Repulsion Suspicion

One thing that remains is the uneven tolerance for images. For whole civilisations iconoclasm, or the destruction of images, was considered the most terrible religious crime, for others the most terrible religious crime was idolatry. Today the visual dilemma has hit new heights: suspect images of the visceral type are managed by an industrialised moderation of what we see, and at the same time there is a looming sense that the truth of the future image is reserved not for human decipherability.

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Building the Eye

In the second half of the 18th century a tangible théâtromanie in France perpetuated a nation-wide theatre reform creating a wave of architectural production of “ideal theatres” (T. E. Lawrenson) and hypothetical new playhouses. Around the same time the theatre became conceptually understood as a giant architectural eye (P. Camp). In Claude-Nicolas Ledoux’s “Coup d’oeil du théâtre de Besançon” (above) we see in the reflection of an actor’s eye on stage, a view of the auditorium of his Besançon Theatre, completed in 1784 and whose façade still remains.

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A Walk As a Designed Crevasse

Anyu Chan

The set architectural parameters were to have a linear line connecting the urban fabric of the site, over the highway and train and submerging into the landscape ending at the ocean. This creates a perspectival visual intention onto the line of walk. The emphasis of bodily movement is on speed, as influenced by the ground and spatial ambience indexes– whether time is passing faster, slower, or at a standstill.

"A Walk As a Designed Crevasse" comes from the project Walker's Reality: the project interest is to explore the deliberacy in an image looking at the tension between noticing and not noticing through the lens of familiarity. It is to deliberately give attention to the concept of what is already there and realising the considered and conscious notion in an image, a scene, and a space. Using an image as a primary generator of space, the visual creates the visual. The design re-introduces a piece of scattered nature as a recognised public garden. It is an oasis that seemingly forms a straight line cutting through the terrain– where one’s movement is governed first by what they see in perspective, then followed by their bodily movements flowing through this line, while questioning one's assumed reality in depth and speed.

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The No Book Library

Dominic Oliver

In the post-leisure meeting space, signifiers are more important than the physical objects that produce them. The library is reduced to a mere representation of one because in simply signifying knowledge it still functions.

"The No Book Library" comes from the project Smart Casual: A post-leisure hotel resists the flattening of work. New media has dissolved the office into an omnipresent veneer of labour. The project exploits the disjunct between the anachronistic display screen and its content. Regressive image loops become a living material that defines space. Homeomorphic deformations create somatic screens, encouraging employees to engage in face-to-face ‘recorporation’ to reverse the enmeshing of work and leisure. Located within the Huawei research campus, the hotel is also a reaction against the Maoist Chinese work unit (danwei) and the fictional ‘Union’ that diverts ownership from Huawei employees to the state.

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The Language of Plaster Sledging

Emily Dawson

The domestic space is the curation of its inhabitant. Objects and possessions behave as elements in the self image whilst familiar symbols of domesticity foster an environment of intimacy and engagement. Experimenting with the scale of symbols within the domestic, this project uses the plaster sledging technique to create architectural elements which establish how space is inhabited. The Cocktail Lounge-Hall and A Man’s Bed-Sitting Room utilise the imperfections of the plaster sledging technique to transition between two hyper-personalised spaces.

"The Language of Plaster Sledging" comes from the project Constructing the Communal: situated within the legacy of the Ideal Home Exhibition, which established itself as a three-dimensional advice manual, this project intends to inspire new avenues of thought on spatial production in a communal dwelling. Constructing the Communal transforms the typical London terrace house by application of a developed technique of plaster sledging, in which the inhabitants themselves are involved in the dynamic making process. The final result is an architecture whereby the stories of its construction are left behind as traces upon the plaster’s surface. Collective effort and individual self expression coalesce to create a formal expression on the notion of sharing space.

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r(rotate), (smudge), ctrl+x(cut), v(move), p(anchor_point), z(zoom)

Kate Frew

The architect’s role becomes one of post processing; testing the brickwork as canvas for edit via an extrapolated palette of photoshop tools upon an existing terrace.

"r(rotate), (smudge), ctrl+x(cut), v(move), p(anchor_point), z(zoom)" comes from the project Intelligence in an Image: the flatness of the .img file is deceptive. Contained within the apparent rigidity of its structure, processes of its creation, storage and display give rise to moments of hidden intelligence and digital recalibration. The project seeks to design within this realm of misinterpretation and distortion in order to explore what it means to be hidden, spatially, in an online climate of full exposure. Situated behind a wall of London terrace, the carved space becomes a safehouse for those attempting to become digitally traceless, the architecture an amalgamation of crop, sponge, anchor point and blur between what is known to be there and what is possible to obscure.

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Modular Furniture System

Lara Bryan

The modular furniture system is designed using the text-image-form process. Poly- relationships are fluid and dynamics change frequently. The modular system is responsive to these conditions, and can be adapted to the type of polyamorous home it is in. It comprises surfaces and supports which have male and female parts that slot together. Some elements are created with functional element fittings, such as sinks and hobs. Parts can be added and subtracted, catering to each specific relationship and its dynamics.

"Modular Furniture System" comes from the project Housing the Polycule: with the technological advances of the past decade, the ways by which we socially interact and develop interpersonal relationships have evolved and many feel less bound by traditional relationship norms. We unquestioningly accept housing types that we have inherited and the behaviours they encourage. Though, if space is a reflection of the society that constructs it, are our homes not in need of an update? How can we use new technologies to help evolve or alter the way we inhabit space, enabling us to break away from normative behaviours encouraged by the homes we live in? Polyamory, also known as ethical non-monogamy, is the practice of engaging in multiple romantic and/or sexual relationships with the consent of all the people involved. Polyamory and cohabitation are not constitutionally linked; our current domestic spaces do not support non-normative relationships. This design seeks to create four dwellings for different sets of polyamorous people in Seoul. The project uses an ai [text - image - form] generative process to aid the design and create furnitures for the dwellings.

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Digital Translation of Recollection

Raluca Moldoveanu

Following the archival process, items are made available to be viewed digitally using physical artefacts scattered around the preservation garden. Visitors would therefore be able to scan and augment the trigger artefacts in order to retrieve the previously archived information. This aims to provide an increasingly tangible interaction with memory though the digital.

"Digital Translation of Recollection" comes from the project The Preservation Garden: the transition into an era of manufacturing processes has affected the way we clean and tidy, culminating in an involuntary removal of its ritualistic element. Through the lens of decluttering, the project is obscuring the co-dependency and opposition of physical/digital, natural/artificial, inside/outside, while addressing the unbalanced relation between person and object in the context of embedded memory. A garden building, acting as a ceremonial device for translating memory from physical to digital, inhabits the tense environment between the meditative Imperial Palace grounds and the business quarter in central Tokyo. The project aims to mediate the Kodokushi phenomenon of ‘lonely death’ through acknowledging the relationship to possessions and their utility or value.

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The Beauty Tutorial

Divya Patel

This project explains the harnessing of the political dimension of the YouTube make-up tutorial.

"The Beauty Tutorial" comes from the project Fake Deep: contemporary beauty ideals are seasonal and reactive to socio-cultural attitudes. With the beauty industry being one of the most lucrative in the world, it is evident that beauty is not simply an unnecessary inconvenience but in fact defines value. Image production is the most powerful tool in perpetuating beauty ideals, beauty products and beauty routines. They form measures of success for the beauty influencer and, more widely, the industry. With such an emphasis on the surface, this architectural project aims to unmask the black box of beauty trends by designing a micro-seasonal future. Drawing from fashion, theories of proportionality and geography, a building is created that explains the organisational spatial systems that unravel the secrets behind the beautiful image.

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Domestic Discussions

Farid Karim

The reconstruction of my grandparents’ home was void of much detail. My grandma responded by (literally) furnishing my memories with hers, through discussion. The only physical object that last from their archive of Syria is this ivory souvenir. It was below the TV cabinet.

"Domestic Discussions" comes from the project Remembering Aleppo: for five years Aleppo has been dragged through the epicentre of an ongoing civil war. This has resulted in both memory being destroyed and destruction being remembered. With unprecedented accessibility to the internet using smartphones, there has been an indiscriminate flurry of data digitally archiving events, objects and spaces– of military, historical and personal significance. Generating a sensorial taxonomy of textures, aromas and sounds, image has proven to be a fundamental tool for both personal and digital reconstruction. Aleppean domesticity is slowly being remembered. Whilst memory– in both senses of the word– has been displaced by digital translations, for many Aleppean residents everyday domesticity and tradition have also been subject to geographical displacement. The project follows the domestic relocation of the author's grandparents from the once merchant metropolis of Aleppo to the Scandinavian suburbs of Sweden, specifically to a shopping mall atrium in Stockholm where similar to the coffee houses of Aleppo, a new public domesticity has begun to flourish. This sensitive threshold between the personal and the generic uses the digital as a mediator for reconstruction, not necessarily to resolve but certainly to preserve. At the very least, remember.

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Samsung OS Default Icons #01-03

Frederick Sheppard

Icon #01 is digital affordance that represents an image-based archive. Icon #02 is digital affordance that represents customisation of a digital interface. Icon #03 is digital affordance that represents engaging interaction with a digital interface. The generation of a third dimension to the affordance encodes a multitude of other information, obscuring the original iconographic affordance. Only from a specific view can this original digital affordance be rediscovered.

"Samsung OS Default Icons #01-03" comes from the project Real-ising Eternity : this project, titled "Real-ising Eternity", explores the possibilities of a new formal language for the physical realm at a time when its boundaries between with the digital are becoming increasingly blurred. The exploration is driven by research into changes to perception, brought about by digital tools and interfaces that are ever-permeating our physical and social rituals. In particular, the project focuses on notions of affordance and how such fundamental understandings can translate and mutate between digital and physical contexts. Our growing dependence on screen-based media to experience the world around us is examined, defining new values that arise at material, object, and spatial levels. The developments of such research and analysis inform an architectural methodology that is applied to the design of a highrise building, concluding the project with an exaggerated aesthetic that comments on the dependence on digital tools within architectural practice and contemporary society as a whole.

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Natural Modelling

Guy Mills

When dealing with such intricate landscapes, orthographic toolsets given by modelling softwares become unsuitable.These brushes sample fragments of nature, from a blade of grass, to the whole park, through high resolution point clouds, alpha channels, and zmaps. These tools have been employed to model spaces with the very nature that surrounds them.

"Natural Modelling" comes from the project The WiLD Network: the WiLD Network is a living organism telecommunications system made to mitigate the negative ecological impact of data storage and transmission.

Using trees as antenna, plants for data storage, and seeds for archiving, the WiLD Network shapes technology– which we now are unable to live without– to find dependence on nature, and pursues an ontological shift towards the maintenance of foliage as we currently do our beloved machines.

By exploring the pre-existing relationship between nature and cyberspace, this project posits how technology reciprocates its connectivity by offering hyper-specific resolutions of nature and, in turn, dictates the form and organisation of both the virtual and the physical landscapes. Ultimately, the WiLD Network enacts a self-saving custodianship upon the living world: as we all know, a gardener's work is never done.

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Ventilation and Astrology

Jamie Kuehn

The ventilation levels can be used as laundries and drying rooms and perform as feng shui solutions at the same time. The project juxtaposes seemingly contradictory aspects that prepare the architecture for transformation and contemporary adjustment. In drawing attention towards qualities overlooked for not fitting traditional cultural categories, the proposal performs as a stage or a film set that allows the simultaneity of contradictions, real and fictional. Nostalgic and futuristic.

"Ventilation and Astrology" comes from the project Apparitions: the Culture of Disappearance of the Mirador Mansion: the anonymous realm of metropoles with a society in perpetual motion is difficult to categorise. The disappearance of culture creates a world which fosters multiple identities within cities, buildings and within a single subject. The act of disappearing is closely linked to apparitions that dissolve the momentary state into a new appearance. It is a process of becoming something else unexpectedly.

This project explores the advantages of unexpectedness and ambiguity in a residential skyscraper in Hong Kong. The city’s unique temporal and cultural intermediate state between Great Britain (until 1997) and China (from 2047) adds to the hyper-legibility of the space– giving room to contradiction and difference. By accepting a multifaceted environment and society, conservative division is overcome through an architectural project and disappears into a time- and placelessness.

×

Home Assets

Kane Carrol

Animation software allows for a ‘total’ construction of experience. When building an entire scene from scratch, everything becomes editable and can be heavily tuned to generate highly specific environments and atmospheres. The camera cone has been the most productive way to look and think about the spaces of the home on a granular second-to-second scale. Each second of 30FPS animation can be used to think deeply about the minute dialogues between spaces and emotional experiences of childhood.
Using the camera cone to slice into and isolate various moments in time to produce a set of fragmented geometries and textures every 30 frames that can be read like lines in a script or notes in a score of music.

"Home Assets" comes from the project The Bicameral Home: now more than ever, our relationship with the future is defined by a state of fear and uncertainty. Each day, we face new omens that remind us of our inability to know or act. Against this perpetual unknowing, we have only visceral emotion and feeling to drive us forward. We live inside a horror movie– but it is without end credits.

Thinking of a child’s coming-of-age as a microcosm of our contemporary anxiety– this project explores, through architecture, how base instinct and emotions guide us through strange and unfamiliar territories. Dissecting, unfolding and augmenting the everyday exchanges between the physical exterior and emotional interior worlds, the design acknowledges and develops a language around the primitive and often polarised relationship with our material reality.

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Temporalising Habitation

Melissa Wear

The spectrum of light is framed by material such that its daily performance is something to be experienced rather than merely directed by.

"Temporalising Habitation" comes from the project Making up Extinction: the transitionary nature of light has been harnessed for political control in the shape of global time zones. Greenwich has established itself as point zero whilst non-uniform landscapes have been subjected as the ‘divided and conquered’. The politically-imagined qualities of allocentrism in GMT have become normalised in the Palladian-influenced architecture of symmetry and quadrapartism, whereby the physical light geographies tend to have been ignored.

In shifting the prevailing grid by 25,000 miles to the antemeridian, how might the architecture of the meridian objectify physical light instead for its temporal characteristics? How would the modes of navigation at 180°W translate to match the egocentrism of 24-hour cultural patterns of the creative city?

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World: Interested

Anyu Chan

Those who are Interested are often distracted. Maximum distraction level is to be expected. With the same architectural language as the world of the undistracted, a directional slit of light comes through from the landscape top that however does not match with the winding path of one's feet. Visual confrontation of blockage and dead ends guide the Interested temporarily away from the linear path.

"World: Interested" comes from the project Walker's Reality: the project interest is to explore the deliberacy in an image looking at the tension between noticing and not noticing through the lens of familiarity. It is to deliberately give attention to the concept of what is already there and realising the considered and conscious notion in an image, a scene, and a space. Using an image as a primary generator of space, the visual creates the visual. The design re-introduces a piece of scattered nature as a recognised public garden. It is an oasis that seemingly forms a straight line cutting through the terrain– where one’s movement is governed first by what they see in perspective, then followed by their bodily movements flowing through this line, while questioning one's assumed reality in depth and speed.

×

Tumbledryer

Dominic Oliver

The search to have meaningful entertainment becomes a process of labour itself. Sick of working long hours by the glazed curtain wall, the employees prefer to watch—as humans have always done—the repetitive turn of the tumbledryer.

"Tumbledryer" comes from the project Smart Casual: A post-leisure hotel resists the flattening of work. New media has dissolved the office into an omnipresent veneer of labour. The project exploits the disjunct between the anachronistic display screen and its content. Regressive image loops become a living material that defines space. Homeomorphic deformations create somatic screens, encouraging employees to engage in face-to-face ‘recorporation’ to reverse the enmeshing of work and leisure. Located within the Huawei research campus, the hotel is also a reaction against the Maoist Chinese work unit (danwei) and the fictional ‘Union’ that diverts ownership from Huawei employees to the state.

×

A Kit of Parts

Emily Dawson

A kit of parts is handed from the architect to the occupants. Specific profiles are designated to communal spaces while the individual’s private space is left for personalisation. Limitless configurations of the profile are dragged through setting plaster.

"A Kit of Parts" comes from the project Constructing the Communal: situated within the legacy of the Ideal Home Exhibition, which established itself as a three-dimensional advice manual, this project intends to inspire new avenues of thought on spatial production in a communal dwelling. Constructing the Communal transforms the typical London terrace house by application of a developed technique of plaster sledging, in which the inhabitants themselves are involved in the dynamic making process. The final result is an architecture whereby the stories of its construction are left behind as traces upon the plaster’s surface. Collective effort and individual self expression coalesce to create a formal expression on the notion of sharing space.

×

Reading the Image

Kate Frew

Like the photoshopping of a doctored image, moments of intrigue are considered at a pixel level detail, the edges or inconsistencies only materialising at full, blown-up, resolution. In presentation, its reading becomes a mirage; disappearing and returning, glimpsed in fragments and turning still image to animation.

"Reading the Image" comes from the project Intelligence in an Image: the flatness of the .img file is deceptive. Contained within the apparent rigidity of its structure, processes of its creation, storage and display give rise to moments of hidden intelligence and digital recalibration. The project seeks to design within this realm of misinterpretation and distortion in order to explore what it means to be hidden, spatially, in an online climate of full exposure. Situated behind a wall of London terrace, the carved space becomes a safehouse for those attempting to become digitally traceless, the architecture an amalgamation of crop, sponge, anchor point and blur between what is known to be there and what is possible to obscure.

×

Tea for Three

Lara Bryan

The design reimagines what objects and spaces would they look like if they were not designed around and for the nuclear family and monogamy. It embodies the nuances of polyamory, building in the contradictions that lay at its core.

"Tea for Three" comes from the project Housing the Polycule: with the technological advances of the past decade, the ways by which we socially interact and develop interpersonal relationships have evolved and many feel less bound by traditional relationship norms. We unquestioningly accept housing types that we have inherited and the behaviours they encourage. Though, if space is a reflection of the society that constructs it, are our homes not in need of an update? How can we use new technologies to help evolve or alter the way we inhabit space, enabling us to break away from normative behaviours encouraged by the homes we live in? Polyamory, also known as ethical non-monogamy, is the practice of engaging in multiple romantic and/or sexual relationships with the consent of all the people involved. Polyamory and cohabitation are not constitutionally linked; our current domestic spaces do not support non-normative relationships. This design seeks to create four dwellings for different sets of polyamorous people in Seoul. The project uses an ai [text - image - form] generative process to aid the design and create furnitures for the dwellings.

×

Garden as Recollection Catalogue

Raluca Moldoveanu

Garden space mediates the tension between physical and digital areas in a hybrid landscape where object existence boundaries are obscured by a lush natural environment. Here, artefacts become digital memorials of past experiences, while the preservation garden is in direct conversation with the city by naturalising the urban scenario.

"Garden as Recollection Catalogue" comes from the project The Preservation Garden: the transition into an era of manufacturing processes has affected the way we clean and tidy, culminating in an involuntary removal of its ritualistic element. Through the lens of decluttering, the project is obscuring the co-dependency and opposition of physical/digital, natural/artificial, inside/outside, while addressing the unbalanced relation between person and object in the context of embedded memory. A garden building, acting as a ceremonial device for translating memory from physical to digital, inhabits the tense environment between the meditative Imperial Palace grounds and the business quarter in central Tokyo. The project aims to mediate the Kodokushi phenomenon of ‘lonely death’ through acknowledging the relationship to possessions and their utility or value.

×

Rig-Space

Divya Patel

The roof forms an artificial landscape above the ground. It is filled with trusses of differing densities that house a series of lighting, sound, and other techniques. Each is manipulating the temporary objects on the ground plane, consequenting in constant production and distribution of beauty ideals.

"Rig-Space" comes from the project Fake Deep: contemporary beauty ideals are seasonal and reactive to socio-cultural attitudes. With the beauty industry being one of the most lucrative in the world, it is evident that beauty is not simply an unnecessary inconvenience but in fact defines value. Image production is the most powerful tool in perpetuating beauty ideals, beauty products and beauty routines. They form measures of success for the beauty influencer and, more widely, the industry. With such an emphasis on the surface, this architectural project aims to unmask the black box of beauty trends by designing a micro-seasonal future. Drawing from fashion, theories of proportionality and geography, a building is created that explains the organisational spatial systems that unravel the secrets behind the beautiful image.

×

Remembering Aleppo Whilst Shopping

Farid Karim

Displaced Aleppean domesticity hosted within the atrium of a Swedish shopping mall.

"Remembering Aleppo Whilst Shopping" comes from the project Remembering Aleppo: for five years Aleppo has been dragged through the epicentre of an ongoing civil war. This has resulted in both memory being destroyed and destruction being remembered. With unprecedented accessibility to the internet using smartphones, there has been an indiscriminate flurry of data digitally archiving events, objects and spaces– of military, historical and personal significance. Generating a sensorial taxonomy of textures, aromas and sounds, image has proven to be a fundamental tool for both personal and digital reconstruction. Aleppean domesticity is slowly being remembered. Whilst memory– in both senses of the word– has been displaced by digital translations, for many Aleppean residents everyday domesticity and tradition have also been subject to geographical displacement. The project follows the domestic relocation of the author's grandparents from the once merchant metropolis of Aleppo to the Scandinavian suburbs of Sweden, specifically to a shopping mall atrium in Stockholm where similar to the coffee houses of Aleppo, a new public domesticity has begun to flourish. This sensitive threshold between the personal and the generic uses the digital as a mediator for reconstruction, not necessarily to resolve but certainly to preserve. At the very least, remember.

×

Institute of Future Affordance - 11th Floor Plan

Frederick Sheppard

The methodology of urban projection results in a spatial logic where programmatic spaces intercept one another, creating unexpected dialogue between various functions of the building.

"Institute of Future Affordance - 11th Floor Plan" comes from the project Real-ising Eternity : this project, titled "Real-ising Eternity", explores the possibilities of a new formal language for the physical realm at a time when its boundaries between with the digital are becoming increasingly blurred. The exploration is driven by research into changes to perception, brought about by digital tools and interfaces that are ever-permeating our physical and social rituals. In particular, the project focuses on notions of affordance and how such fundamental understandings can translate and mutate between digital and physical contexts. Our growing dependence on screen-based media to experience the world around us is examined, defining new values that arise at material, object, and spatial levels. The developments of such research and analysis inform an architectural methodology that is applied to the design of a highrise building, concluding the project with an exaggerated aesthetic that comments on the dependence on digital tools within architectural practice and contemporary society as a whole.

×

Victoria Park as Building

Guy Mills

As The WiLD Network grows into fruition and information becomes completely synonymous with plants, a new relationship and understanding of nature will be established.
It is imperative that we refrain from a monotonous flora and therefore culture as global temperate creeps up.

"Victoria Park as Building" comes from the project The WiLD Network: the WiLD Network is a living organism telecommunications system made to mitigate the negative ecological impact of data storage and transmission.

Using trees as antenna, plants for data storage, and seeds for archiving, the WiLD Network shapes technology– which we now are unable to live without– to find dependence on nature, and pursues an ontological shift towards the maintenance of foliage as we currently do our beloved machines.

By exploring the pre-existing relationship between nature and cyberspace, this project posits how technology reciprocates its connectivity by offering hyper-specific resolutions of nature and, in turn, dictates the form and organisation of both the virtual and the physical landscapes. Ultimately, the WiLD Network enacts a self-saving custodianship upon the living world: as we all know, a gardener's work is never done.

×

Dry Cleaning

Jamie Kuehn

Like the stories and myths that enliven a building, the building itself becomes an innovative site of collaboration and contestation for both the city and its citizens. Its apparitional character allows for unexpected appearances, cultural hybridities and new myths of belonging.

"Dry Cleaning" comes from the project Apparitions: the Culture of Disappearance of the Mirador Mansion: the anonymous realm of metropoles with a society in perpetual motion is difficult to categorise. The disappearance of culture creates a world which fosters multiple identities within cities, buildings and within a single subject. The act of disappearing is closely linked to apparitions that dissolve the momentary state into a new appearance. It is a process of becoming something else unexpectedly.

This project explores the advantages of unexpectedness and ambiguity in a residential skyscraper in Hong Kong. The city’s unique temporal and cultural intermediate state between Great Britain (until 1997) and China (from 2047) adds to the hyper-legibility of the space– giving room to contradiction and difference. By accepting a multifaceted environment and society, conservative division is overcome through an architectural project and disappears into a time- and placelessness.

×

Augmented Home Video

Kane Carrol

Four moments have been selected: those that were both emotionally and architecturally significant to the child’s daily experience of the home.

—the bedroom;
—the corridor;
—the bathroom; and,
—the kitchen.

Acknowledging these fragments as the basic framework of what a child sees and experiences, further spatial design explorations have been conducted. Disturbing and augmented, they provoke a more visceral reading of ongoing dialogues within the home.

"Augmented Home Video" comes from the project The Bicameral Home: now more than ever, our relationship with the future is defined by a state of fear and uncertainty. Each day, we face new omens that remind us of our inability to know or act. Against this perpetual unknowing, we have only visceral emotion and feeling to drive us forward. We live inside a horror movie– but it is without end credits.

Thinking of a child’s coming-of-age as a microcosm of our contemporary anxiety– this project explores, through architecture, how base instinct and emotions guide us through strange and unfamiliar territories. Dissecting, unfolding and augmenting the everyday exchanges between the physical exterior and emotional interior worlds, the design acknowledges and develops a language around the primitive and often polarised relationship with our material reality.

×

Simulating the Sun

Melissa Wear

The political harnessing of light has an oddly imaginative nature. The subjection of the islands of the antemeridian to time zone discrimination, has encouraged a sport of time zone ‘leaping’. In 2009 Samoa jumped the international date line giving up its last sunset for the first sunrise.
Until 1994, Kiribati straddled the line, occupying both Monday and Tuesday at once. Though, in contrast to the imagined light politicisation of longitude, this sunset experiment demonstrates the physicality of latitude due to the bulge of the equator. The sun rising bottom-left screen in Greenwich escapes the screen in Kiribati– resulting in phenomena frequently told as “a bigger sky”. Might abstracted colour simulate the quality of a place?

"Simulating the Sun" comes from the project Making up Extinction: the transitionary nature of light has been harnessed for political control in the shape of global time zones. Greenwich has established itself as point zero whilst non-uniform landscapes have been subjected as the ‘divided and conquered’. The politically-imagined qualities of allocentrism in GMT have become normalised in the Palladian-influenced architecture of symmetry and quadrapartism, whereby the physical light geographies tend to have been ignored.

In shifting the prevailing grid by 25,000 miles to the antemeridian, how might the architecture of the meridian objectify physical light instead for its temporal characteristics? How would the modes of navigation at 180°W translate to match the egocentrism of 24-hour cultural patterns of the creative city?